GET READY FOR THE DORM

It's that time of year and many young adults are getting ready for college life. Living in the dorm can be a very rewarding experience, but it can also be a challenge. Besides learning to live with a roommate that you may or may not get along with, you will also be learning how to take care of your own schedule, manage your money, and manage your time. This article, however, is just about how to manage your stuff.

When you start packing, you'll need to keep in mind how much space you have in the dorm. Most dorm rooms include a desk with a few cabinets or drawers and a closet. Some, if you're lucky, will also have a small dresser where you can keep some of your clothes. Be selective about what you bring so that you don't end up living in a mountain of clothes. Choosing shirts that go with multiple pairs of pants or tank tops and cover-ups that can be layered to create different looks and work in changing weather is a good place to start.

Remember that you don't have to bring everything that you own. You can pack enough clothes for a month or two and leave the rest at home. When you come home to visit, bring your clothes and swap out the ones that are out of season, style, don’t fit after that freshman fifteen, or that you simply don't wear a lot. Rotating your wardrobe like this will save you a lot of space in the dorm and help you to keep laundry under control. After all, if your clothes are all dirty and they only make up two loads, then it won't be much of a hassle to go down to the laundry area and wash them all at once. It's when four or five loads pile up that you'll be wishing you didn't have so many clothes with you.

Keeping the little bit of space that you do have organized will help you to keep more on hand. You can invest a few dollars in risers for your bed to raise it up, creating storage underneath. Find out if your dorm rules allow for you to put up shelves to give you extra storage space for little things. Use a trunk for a nightstand so that you can store things inside of it. If you buy any furniture for the dorm, try to get items that have a double use.

Using space saving hangers appropriately will help you to stretch that small closet space a long way.  Slimline clothes hangers or metal hangers in the closet will help save space and allow you to hang more garments. Cascading hangers help you to maximize space without sacrificing wardrobe by utilizing your closets vertical space. Get creative and you'll find yourself living comfortably in the dorms in no time.

About the Author: Jo Granville is on the staff of Only Hangers, a leading online resource for space saving hangers. For more information, please visit https://www.onlyhangers.com.